Since February 22, 2009, the ” Erlebniszentrum Naturgewalten“. Today we visited this center. The futuristic building, located on the so-called elbow, houses three themed areas on 1500 square meters, “Forces of the North Sea”, “Living with the forces of nature” and “Climate, weather, climate research”. At the entrance you get after a solution of the ticket, incidentally, the proud price of 11 €, also handed out a headset, which is used at many stations.

In German, Danish and English the explanatory comments are spoken, not too long and very interesting. The mix of reading boards and multimedia was well received by us. There is also a storm room where you can experience the different wind forces on your own body. However, there was to our visit time, doldrums in the storm room.

In trial operation, it turned out that he needs improvement. At many information points, including so-called “thought cells”, was pointed to the precarious situation Sylts. As the sea level rises due to climate change, Sylt faces the problem of getting smaller and smaller.

Storms also gnaw at the island and demand a bit more of the island after each storm. A visit to the center is worthwhile, you learn a lot about the fragile system of the climate on the Wadden Sea.

What made me think, though, was the shop in the foyer of the adventure center! The following statement can be found on the website of the Center under the topic “Our Philosophy”: ” The ” Erlebniszentrum Naturgewalten “also wants to be a prime example of the sustainable use of resources. Energy consumption and climate-relevant emissions have therefore been reduced to a minimum by numerous measures.

That sounds great, of course, and goes very well with the climate protection approach! However, the shop in the foyer sells a lot of stuffed animals such as seals, penguins, shells, sharks and other plastic stuff, which is consistently produced in China or India, so to read on the small labels. The fact that it has covered thousands of kilometers and produced plenty of emissions does not bother the management of the house. Here I see a need for action!

On the return journey by bus from List to Westerland, I looked at the roofs of the houses. I was just being made sensitive to the Sylt ecosystem. I found out that of the hundreds of houses I saw, not one single solar cell on the roof.

The bus was also powered by diesel instead of natural gas. Service vehicles or taxis could also be operated on the island with natural gas! By the way, it is flooded with cars. A reactivation of the island railway would, therefore, be extremely useful! Maybe you should leave only gas or electric vehicles on the island. Somehow the Sylters themselves did not understand yet, that just them, living on a strongly endangered island, should lead by example.